Hiking and backpacking food

It has been observed that we mention food a lot in our posts! That’s probably because it’s a very important part of our experience: a tasty treat can be a great reward and in some situations even redeem an otherwise miserable day!

The food we take varies considerably between activities and has evolved over the years. On the first mountain day out I ever went on with Chris, and my first Scottish hill day, we tackled Curved Ridge in Glencoe and took SO MUCH food, including jelly cubes, flapjack and fruity things in tubes: it cost a fortune! In the end we were back down before lunch, had hardly eaten any of it and went for lunch in the Clachaig!

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Everyone enjoying a sandwich in the snow

 

I also used to get very nervous before we went out into the mountains and couldn’t eat any breakfast. I would  sometimes struggle to eat a lot during the day, and this has probably influenced our choices. I would find myself feeling horrible an hour or so after starting but then realised that I felt much better in the afternoon, possibly because I had eaten more by then. Now I often eat a cereal bar soon after setting off or even sometimes as we leave the car! As a result we try to ensure that we take appetising food and snacks, so that there is always something to look forward too.

We do not stop for an official lunch break, but usually have multiple snack and lunch breaks and something to see us through to the end. This allows us a breather, a chance to enjoy the views and top up on energy, and we find it works much better, than one or long pauses.

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Regular breaks allow you to appreciate where you are!

Hill days

For single day trips we take some form of sandwiches: the absolute favourites are bacon sandwiches! Cheese and chilli jam sandwiches probably come second: the chilli is great when it’s cold. We store them in plastic boxes to avoid single use bags, cling film or foil. For snacks, Chris loves granola bars, I like flapjack squares. Hobnobs or oatie biscuits are almost always with us and are great for sharing.

Bananas get squished, apples usually end up staying in the bag. The jelly never got eaten so we don’t take it anymore. Last year we bought a good flask so we can have hot chocolate or hot squash on winter days, which is a nice treat when drinking your water gives you brain freeze and it boosts our moods. Kitkats have made a recent appearance and will stay on the list. Chocolate raisins are a treat saved for the final tired kilometres on really big days.

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It’s especially important to stop for food in bad conditions; our shelter (the red cafe) allows us to take the time to this

This sounds pretty unhealthy, but hiking with large rucksacks uses an incredible amount of energy, so we aren’t too worried, especially as our usual daily diet is fairly healthy. If anyone has any delicious healthier options they would like to suggest though, we would love to hear them!

We have also found that with experience and improved hill fitness, we now take less and don’t need expensive food, and no longer always need an shopping trip before heading out for a hill day. We don’t have official emergency rations either, but I don’t think we’ve ever eaten everything we take.

Multi-day backpacking

Keeping the cost down was something we also thought about when planning what we would eat on our TGO Challenge. In May 2017, we walked across Scotland, carrying all our equipment and wild camping most of the way. This was to take a fortnight, which was much longer than any previous trip; food organisation therefore represented a very important of our preparation! It was also quite a social event and we were complimented a few times on our food (and the quantity we ate!).

Many people used food resupply parcels and there was a lot of talk about, and offers for, specialist dehydrated backpacking meals. Our route took us through small towns approximately every four days, so we decided to buy what we needed at each place. We just sent one parcel to a town where we weren’t sure we’d have time to buy food before catching a ferry. Specialist camping and hiking food is expensive! Having seen this post about food for long distance hiking, we decided we didn’t need it.

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Food for four days of backpacking and wild camping: almost all of it can be found in any small shop

We had a single MSR Windburner stove that is excellent for boiling water quickly but not great at cooking anything else, so our options were quite limited. For breakfast, we decided on granola with powdered milk: the oats keep you full, there’s lots of sugary energy and it wouldn’t need cooking if the weather was bad or we needed an early start. We mixed it up occasionally with bacon rolls when available and some instant porridge.

For lunch, sandwiches weren’t practical, so we started with oat cakes and hummus. When we were tired of these, we tried garlic naan bread and a cup of soup or crackers with squeezy cheese. Best of all was cold pizza, cooked on the few nights we spent in a hostel (it’s awesome, do it!).

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Cold pizza in plastic boxes: a classic in Glen Affric on the 1st day of our TGO Challenge

We practised our dinners before we left, testing out a few options, which I would highly recommend, even if just to gauge the quantities required. All testing was successful and all we needed was boiling water and a plastic lunch box each. Sachets of flavoured couscous (like this) were brilliant: there are different flavours so you don’t get too bored. We chopped smoked sausage or chorizo into the couscous in our boxes and simply poured on hot water, stirred and left it for 5 minutes. When we were tired of couscous, we did the same with fine noodles and chorizo but added a small tub of stir-in sauce, or had smash and smoked sausage. These were all surprisingly delicious, required very little fuel and were extremely light and easy to prepare. We always looked forward to them and they were easily digestible, which is important when doing strenuous exercise; we were given a dehydrated meal on one night but it didn’t re-hydrate well and Chris didn’t feel right after it all the next day….we were very happy with our corner shop options.

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A plastic pot is very useful for allowing hot meals to sit and for keeping your lunch in, thus avoiding creating too much rubbish

Chris often had a cup of soup for a starter which is good for taking in extra water. Pudding usually comprised instant custard (occasionally semolina, when Chris picked it up by accident, which turned out to be also OK) and/or hot chocolate (and possibly hobnobs!).

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Testing out meals on the MSR Windburner in chilly conditions

Snacks included all the regulars, as well as home-made trail mix (raisins, nuts, seeds, chocolate buttons/raisins, etc), which started well but by the end, I just picked the best bits outs and was left with a bag of stale raisins and lots of sunflower seeds that are still in the kitchen cupboard (and will probably stay there for a year or two).

Whenever we were passing through towns or staying in hostels, we made sure to eat plenty of fruit and veg!

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A perfect evening meal on our TGO Challenge

Getting through the tough bits

We had also been given a pile of protein bars and Chris won a box of Cliff bars before we left; we had enough for one each everyday of the Challenge and they actually became a key item, perfect for getting me through the three o’clock slump!

I have also found that Dextro Energy Orange tablets are brilliant when I feel done-in. I have never had more than two a day but on scrambling days when I can’t eat due to nerves or to get me down that last bit of thigh-trembling descent when I’m exhausted and struggling, one of these can be a big help.

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Bacon sandwich with a view!

What do you eat on your adventures?

Eating well is definitely part of the fun!

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Jessica and Chris’ TGO Challenge Part 5: Tarfside to Montrose

We were so close. Just two more days of walking and we would complete the challenge. I tried not to get ahead of myself though, as the walk from Tarfside to the North Water Bridge campsite was 27km. They were a very warm 27 km!

We went back to the church, were the TGO volunteers had based themselves, to fill up on bacon rolls and tea, before we headed off. Because the volunteers were all experienced challengers, they were able to give us some route suggestions for the last two days of our trip. They pointed out to us some new bridges that were not on the map but would take us through a more interesting part of the valley, rather than the long road we had originally planed.

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A beautiful morning in Tarfside

This route took us east on the road from Tarfside to a bridge near Millden Lodge. From there we followed the land rover track on the south of the river to a new bridge just before the Rocks of Solitude. It is not on the map but we were assured it was there. Happily the information was spot on, even if we did have to double back through a herd of cows to find the bridge we were looking for; it was a great walk.

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Land rover track can be beautiful

It had been incredibly hot and there were a number of “let’s get the boots off” stops and also “quick, let’s eat the chocolate raisins because they are melting” stops. Fortunately crossing the bridge meant we would soon be under cover of trees, which was very welcome indeed.

Throughout the day we had been in contact with our friend Steph, who after a few phone signal problems, found us just as we were taking a path marked Rocks of Solitude. She brought with her, her 6 month old son Callum, who is the most chilled out toddler ever, until you take him in a buggy over a rough path that is. This made for a short visit but it was lovely to see them both and share a part of our walk with them. Thanks Steph and Callum!

Walking past the Rocks of Solitude and on to the blue door walk just north of Edzell was really gorgeous, and we have to once again thank the TGO volunteers for the tip. However, despite the shade of the trees the heat was relentless, and when we arrived in Edzell we made a bee-line for an ice cream. It was here that we would do our last bit of food shopping, which included a litre of cider to drink at the camp site a little bit later on. It was apparently my job to carry this.

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Enjoying our last camp site

The last part of our day involved crossing the wobbly bridge out of Edzell and the long and exhausting road to the North Water Bridge campsite. It was a tremendous feeling knowing that we had reached the final campsite of our challenge, and we were able to share it with challengers that we had met at Tarfside, which really reinforced just how much we enjoyed the social aspect of the TGO Challenge. We enjoyed our last camping meal and we certainly enjoyed our cider before getting into our sleeping bags for the last time.

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Our last camping meal, we were joined by Callum (left) and Fred (centre)

We were woken up early by the sunshine on another stunning day. It was hard to believe that in 12 km it would all be over and we would be sitting in Montrose celebrating with the other challengers.

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#Tentlife

We had been given an adventurous route by the volunteers in Tarfside, which involved a lot of rough ground on the west side of the Esk river. However with Jessica’s blisters causing a sharp pain with every step, we decided that, “flat ground” pain was better than “rough and uneven ground” pain, so we opted for more land rover track and road to lead us to the beach at Kinnaber Links, just north of Montrose.

From the North Water Bridge camp site, we headed east to a railway bridge, where we followed a path on the west side of the Esk river to Logie Mill before heading west back to the main road.  A very short walk on the main road lead us back to our challenge friend, a landrover track, which took us to Hillside then east to a huge Maltings factory.

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The flat lands on the east

It’s incredible to think that when we started our challenge the only industry we came across were a couple of hotels, a very small cafe and some sheep. But now there were large towns, a massive factory, big restaurants complete with a children’s play area, but still there were sheep.

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One of the many stops on our last day

It had taken many a snack stop to get us to this point in the day and sadly the chocolate raisins in our home made trail mix were finished and we were left with only a small assortment of seeds. Not to worry though, we were so nearly finished and there was only a couple of kilometres between us and the finish point. “Boof, to the sea!” Jessica yelled (that classic mountaineering phrase) as we broke through the trees and onto the beach but not before checking out one more interesting and pretty flower, obviously.

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There is always time to stop and appreciate nature.

We had made it! We had just walked across Scotland! With our feet in the sea and huge smiles on our faces, it made for an incredible moment and one which we will remember forever. It was only a short walk along the beach and into Montrose to the official signing out point where we would later have a celebratory dinner and drinks with all the other challengers that had also finished on the Friday.

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Boof to the Sea!!!!

It was fantastic to see everyone there, many of whom we had met along the way or had spent the last few days with. The social aspect of the challenge was incredible and a real pleasure to be a part of. Thank you to all of you for your encouragement and friendship. A special thanks to Fred and Callum who we spent the last two nights camping with and met up with us on the beach as we walked into Montrose.

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WE DID IT!!!

Writing this now, its hard to believe that we actually walked across Scotland! It was such a special journey for us both and one that we would love to take on again in the future, and despite leg and blister drama we both had a fantastic time together away from busy everyday life. We thoroughly enjoyed, the simple life of the TGO Challenge.

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Walking down to Montrose

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We will always have great memories from our challenge

Thank you:

A huge thank you to Jen and Ade who came to our rescue in Braemar, and your chat was amazing as always; to Steph and her son Callum for keeping us going towards the end; and finally to my Dad and Cath who drove us to our start point and were there to welcome us into Montrose. The support from both of our families and friends throughout the challenge was fantastic. We are also very proud to have raised £818.11 to split between Bliss and Scottish Mountain Rescue, two charities we are proud to support (you can still donate by clicking the links in the text or here: Jessica & Chris’ Justgiving pages).

Day 13 – Tarfside to North Water Bridge (27km 10 hours)

Day 14 – North water Bridge to Kinnaber links and Montrose (12ish km 5.5 hours)

Stanage: Intro to Grit Stone

Stanage Edge is a 4km wall of grit stone located on the Hallam Moors east of Sheffield. It is separated into three different sections: Stanage North, Plantation and Popular. All of this together offers you over 1300 climbing routes, giving you plenty to go at no matter what grade you climb.

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Stanage Popular

We had two days in which to sample the most popular climbing venue in the UK and after a delicious breakfast of French toast, we headed up the short hill to the base of the crag. This only took us 5 minutes. We wanted to start on something simple, having never climbed on grit before, so we chose an easy looking gully for our first climb. We both thought that we would be in for a tricky couple of days, as our easy gully proved to be cold, slimy and awkward.

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#vanlife

However, as the sun began to poke through the morning clouds and after getting a couple more climbs under our belt, we started to get the feel for the grit stone. It was new to us both and the super wide cracks and sloping edges do take a bit of getting used to. By the end of the first day we had climbed over 10 routes including: Crack and Corner S 4b, Mississippi Buttress Direct VS 4c and the classic Flying Buttress HVD 4a.

As day two began, after more French toast of course, we were back on the grit and flicking through the Rockfax guide book for the next climb. We never had to look far. Be warned though, when the guide book says it’s a popular crag, it really means it. We were staggered by how quickly the car park would fill up and just how easily your plans for your next route could be thwarted by other enthusiastic climbers. Everyone at the crag was friendly and it made for a great atmosphere and a real buzz about the place which was brilliant to be a part of.

Having added Bishop’s Route S 4a and the brilliantly intense Hollybush Crack VD to our ever increasing tally of climbs, the sun was setting on our Stanage adventure. We had been here for two days and we had barely scratched the surface of what’s available. After our cold and awkward start we were both leaving with fond memories and the fact that this is a terrific place, well deserving of its superb reputation. We can’t wait to get back some time in the future.

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Sun setting on the last climb of the day.

Top tips:

Be sure to get there early as the car park fills up quickly so by mid-afternoon you may be struggling for a space at Stanage Popular.

Bring big gear, and lots of it! You will find plenty of use for your biggest hex, torque nut or cam.

Whiteout on Beinn Tulaichean

We hadn’t had a proper day in the hills since Helvellyn in the Lake District at the start of the year, so we were determined to go out last weekend. The weather forecast didn’t look too bad but we couldn’t take the van, meaning that we needed somewhere not too far from Stirling (I get grumpy at horrendously early weekend starts!). We settled on Beinn Tulaichean and Cruach Ardrain near Crianlarich in the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park. These hills can be climbed either from the north or from the south; we decided on the latter (because that was the first route we saw!).

The route starts at Inverlochlarig, which is at the end of a very windy but pretty road off the A84, past Balquidder, and along the banks of Loch Voil. There is a good car park (free) with a shelter and a bench inside, providing an ideal spot for getting ready when it is pouring with rain – this was not the weather that was forecast!

We set off fully waterproofed, along the road, over a bridge, to a stile on the right, signposted for our hills. This slightly boggy path leads up onto a landrover track that runs up Inverlochlarig Glen. We followed this for less than 1 km then started thinking about heading up the slope on our left. There was no obvious path, it was sleeting and the cloud was pretty low so we couldn’t see far anyway. We left the landrover track just before coming to a gate and picked our way up via the easiest looking route.

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It was a bit murky and warm as we left the landrover track

The sleet soon turned to proper snow with big, fat, soggy flakes and started to settle, despite the ground not being frozen at all and therefore really wet. The visibility also dropped considerably. Our aim for the day quickly shifted from climbing two munros, to seeing how far we got and cooking lunch on Chris’ stove.

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It started snowing properly

Having climbed a fence, we were struggling to find a way up and around a steeper section. The wet snow was just compacting under our boots and sliding down the grass, making walking up very difficult and resulting in me lying on my stomach in the snow a few times. It was also incredibly warm: there was no wind and despite only wearing our base layers and waterproofs, we still had to take our gloves off to try to stay cool. At this point we met a father and daughter who were coming down, having sensibly backed off higher up as they didn’t have crampons and the visibility had gotten really poor. We followed their tracks up until they stopped, at which point it did get steeper, so we got our ice axes out and carried on carefully. We made it to a flat area that we had seen on the map and stopped for first lunch.

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Lunchtime. Total whiteout conditions by this stage.

I gave Chris a MSR windburner stove for his birthday in September but he has only used it a few times, so rather than take sandwiches as we usually do, we had decided to try out two meals that we might want to use whilst on our TGO Challenge. The first was  sun-dried tomato and garlic flavoured couscous with Matheson’s smoked sausage. The water took about 2 mins to boil and was poured onto the couscous and sausage and left for three minutes. The result: deliciousness! Tasty, super fast and definitely one to use again.

We packed up and carried on into the whiteness; up some even steeper ground that was quite fun and onto a narrower ridge. Here the ground was very confusing and not at all what it appeared to be on the map, which made for some challenging navigation for Chris, as by now we couldn’t see further than 10-15m, although it had stopped snowing. Eventually, having almost bypassed it, we climbed up some rocks and onto the summit; we dug around at some lumps of snow and uncovered a cairn so it must have been the summit right?

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Where’s the view? Are you sure this the summit?

Having eaten some chocolate, drunk some hot squash and laughed at the fact we could be absolutely anywhere, we decided that rather than struggle navigating down to the saddle between the two munros and making our way down to the landrover track from there, it would be easier and much quicker to follow our tracks back the way we came.

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Following our tracks back down

Once back at our flat area again, we had a second lunch of smash and smoked sausage, which was also a huge success and the first time I have eaten smash (besides the spoonful I was given to taste a fortnight ago when Chris bought it). So we now have two very fast, light and filling meals that we can use on our trip making this a very successful day!

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The first break in the cloud

The temperature had dropped a bit as we made our way down, but eventually the clouds started to break and we got a few glimpses of the hills around us. Once under the cloud,  where there was less snow, the descent was pretty difficult as it was still extremely slippery and not much fun, but it was nice to get a bit of a look at our surroundings, which turned out to be pretty nice, as we made our way down the last section and back out to the car.

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Inverlochlarig Burn

Details

Distance: ~9km

Ascent: 809m

Duration: 6h

Munro summit: Beinn Tulaichean (946m)

Comments

As we didn’t see anything, we can’t really comment on the views, but from what we could tell at the bottom there wasn’t much of a path, so in poor weather good navigation is necessary.

Always bring the appropriate equipment: despite how mild it was when we set off, we still carried our ice-axes and crampons. Also, always be prepared to adjust your plans: we very quickly chose not to bother with the second summit and decided our aim was not to gain a summit at all but to test our stove meals instead, something we could do at any altitude and in any weather. The pair we met had also changed their plans, backing off because they didn’t have the necessary equipment. The hills will be there another day!