A day out on Ben Nevis: Ledge Route and CMD

We’d been hoping to do this route for about a year, we’d even put aside a birthday weekend and recruited friends to join us about a month ago but it wasn’t until two weeks ago that the weather and free-time aligned.

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Amazingly our friends were also free, so we met at the North Face car park just before 8am, after a horrible-o’clock alarm and a very misty drive. We set off through the cloudy woodland at around 8.15am and were soon rewarded by emerging above the clouds and the view the cloud inversion through the trees.

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At the bottom of Ledge Route, ready for some scrambling!

We headed up the glen to the CIC hut on the excellent path, with the north face of Ben Nevis shrouded in cloud above us. We had a rest and a sandwich before attacking the steep scree and grass that takes you towards the foot of the Carn Dearg Buttress, into the mouth of Number Five gully and the start of Ledge Route. We began this 450m Grade 1/2 scramble by climbing up what seemed to be a very rocky stream before turning off right up an extremely wet and slippery slab. This required a lot of care, was rather scary and made me a little apprehensive of what was to come if this was just the start!

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Wet and slippery!

However, this was definitely the hardest part and the rest of the route was wonderful! The four of us moved in and out of the mist, briefly getting glimpses of the towering cliffs around us. It was fabulously atmospheric and we stopped often to absorb our brilliant position on the crest.

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The scramble was over all too soon and we emerged at the top near Carn Dearg, so had a fairly long walk over the rocks through the cloud before we came upon the crowds coming up the Tourist Track.

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Scrambly scrambly

Sadly there were no summit views so we didn’t linger long, but continued on to begin descending the boulder field leading to the ridge connecting to Carn Mor Dearg. Moving down over the boulders wasn’t easy but the clouds began to break and we could suddenly the extent of the surrounding mountains.

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The ridge walk is really long and very enjoyable. The rocks and the steepness of the drops down into the coire to our left required a lot of concentration; fortunately we have recently discovered that Tesco’s Finest Triple chocolate cookies make great and uplifting hill snacks, which helped to combat the tiredness!

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A super long ridge walk!

By the time we were making the ascent up to Carn Mor Dearg, the clouds were gone and we could fully appreciate the entire route we had taken earlier in the day and Chris was able to point out all the other exciting lines that we have to go back and do another day!

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The North Face of Ben Nevis

We almost thought we’d managed a whole day out in Scotland without any bog, but we found plenty before we joined the path at the bottom of the valley again and I ended up with a very wet bottom!

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Looking back along the ridge  and out to the Mamores

This is a fabulous day out and was well worth the wait! Looking forward to more ridge walks and scrambling again soon now. Thanks Kirstie and Sam for joining us and to Chris for route-finding in the mist!

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Sam trying to fly!

Munros: Ben Nevis and Carn Mor Dearg

Time: 10 hours

Distance: something like 20-ish km or 12.5-ish miles

 

 

Winter has arrived in Scotland: Meall Ghaordaidh

As winter approaches, what constitutes a “good forecast” has a tendency to change slightly. Take yesterday for example: 30-40mph winds with difficult walking conditions on high ground and severe wind chill might sound unpleasant but there was also 80% chance of cloud free munros and excellent visibility. Actually not so bad for a Scottish winter day (we can always turn around if it’s too bad!).

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Another thing to remember when planning routes at this time of year is the dramatic change in daylight hours; in about six weeks, we’ve gone from nice long days to pitch dark beofore 5pm. It can catch you out!

Sunshine through the spindrift

So Kirstie and I decided to stretch our legs and enjoy a bit of sunshine and possibly some snow (!?) with a wander up Meall Ghaordaidh. It’s not a particularly exciting munro, but the route is fairly short, important as we weren’t starting early and Kirstie is recovering from an arm injury. Situated north-west of Killin, it was also in an area we haven’t explored much.

And it was most definitely worth it: a long steady climb but wonderful views of snow-capped hills and great to be out in some snow for the first time this winter (I think it can officially be called winter now!).

Summit views appreciated very quickly!

On the last stretch to the summit, we were bent into the wind, with heads down to protect our eyes. We remained at the summit for about two whole minutes, which was all we could take with the spindrift being blasted into our faces.

A short way down again and we were out of the wind and able to sit and savour our lunch, sweet tea, the views and the simple fact of bring out on such a fine day.

Details

Distance: 9.5km (5.9miles)

Duration: 4h50m

Munro summit: Meall Ghaordaidh (m)

Ascent: 895m

Jessica and Chris’ TGO Challenge Part 5: Tarfside to Montrose

We were so close. Just two more days of walking and we would complete the challenge. I tried not to get ahead of myself though, as the walk from Tarfside to the North Water Bridge campsite was 27km. They were a very warm 27 km!

We went back to the church, were the TGO volunteers had based themselves, to fill up on bacon rolls and tea, before we headed off. Because the volunteers were all experienced challengers, they were able to give us some route suggestions for the last two days of our trip. They pointed out to us some new bridges that were not on the map but would take us through a more interesting part of the valley, rather than the long road we had originally planed.

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A beautiful morning in Tarfside

This route took us east on the road from Tarfside to a bridge near Millden Lodge. From there we followed the land rover track on the south of the river to a new bridge just before the Rocks of Solitude. It is not on the map but we were assured it was there. Happily the information was spot on, even if we did have to double back through a herd of cows to find the bridge we were looking for; it was a great walk.

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Land rover track can be beautiful

It had been incredibly hot and there were a number of “let’s get the boots off” stops and also “quick, let’s eat the chocolate raisins because they are melting” stops. Fortunately crossing the bridge meant we would soon be under cover of trees, which was very welcome indeed.

Throughout the day we had been in contact with our friend Steph, who after a few phone signal problems, found us just as we were taking a path marked Rocks of Solitude. She brought with her, her 6 month old son Callum, who is the most chilled out toddler ever, until you take him in a buggy over a rough path that is. This made for a short visit but it was lovely to see them both and share a part of our walk with them. Thanks Steph and Callum!

Walking past the Rocks of Solitude and on to the blue door walk just north of Edzell was really gorgeous, and we have to once again thank the TGO volunteers for the tip. However, despite the shade of the trees the heat was relentless, and when we arrived in Edzell we made a bee-line for an ice cream. It was here that we would do our last bit of food shopping, which included a litre of cider to drink at the camp site a little bit later on. It was apparently my job to carry this.

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Enjoying our last camp site

The last part of our day involved crossing the wobbly bridge out of Edzell and the long and exhausting road to the North Water Bridge campsite. It was a tremendous feeling knowing that we had reached the final campsite of our challenge, and we were able to share it with challengers that we had met at Tarfside, which really reinforced just how much we enjoyed the social aspect of the TGO Challenge. We enjoyed our last camping meal and we certainly enjoyed our cider before getting into our sleeping bags for the last time.

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Our last camping meal, we were joined by Callum (left) and Fred (centre)

We were woken up early by the sunshine on another stunning day. It was hard to believe that in 12 km it would all be over and we would be sitting in Montrose celebrating with the other challengers.

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#Tentlife

We had been given an adventurous route by the volunteers in Tarfside, which involved a lot of rough ground on the west side of the Esk river. However with Jessica’s blisters causing a sharp pain with every step, we decided that, “flat ground” pain was better than “rough and uneven ground” pain, so we opted for more land rover track and road to lead us to the beach at Kinnaber Links, just north of Montrose.

From the North Water Bridge camp site, we headed east to a railway bridge, where we followed a path on the west side of the Esk river to Logie Mill before heading west back to the main road.  A very short walk on the main road lead us back to our challenge friend, a landrover track, which took us to Hillside then east to a huge Maltings factory.

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The flat lands on the east

It’s incredible to think that when we started our challenge the only industry we came across were a couple of hotels, a very small cafe and some sheep. But now there were large towns, a massive factory, big restaurants complete with a children’s play area, but still there were sheep.

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One of the many stops on our last day

It had taken many a snack stop to get us to this point in the day and sadly the chocolate raisins in our home made trail mix were finished and we were left with only a small assortment of seeds. Not to worry though, we were so nearly finished and there was only a couple of kilometres between us and the finish point. “Boof, to the sea!” Jessica yelled (that classic mountaineering phrase) as we broke through the trees and onto the beach but not before checking out one more interesting and pretty flower, obviously.

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There is always time to stop and appreciate nature.

We had made it! We had just walked across Scotland! With our feet in the sea and huge smiles on our faces, it made for an incredible moment and one which we will remember forever. It was only a short walk along the beach and into Montrose to the official signing out point where we would later have a celebratory dinner and drinks with all the other challengers that had also finished on the Friday.

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Boof to the Sea!!!!

It was fantastic to see everyone there, many of whom we had met along the way or had spent the last few days with. The social aspect of the challenge was incredible and a real pleasure to be a part of. Thank you to all of you for your encouragement and friendship. A special thanks to Fred and Callum who we spent the last two nights camping with and met up with us on the beach as we walked into Montrose.

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WE DID IT!!!

Writing this now, its hard to believe that we actually walked across Scotland! It was such a special journey for us both and one that we would love to take on again in the future, and despite leg and blister drama we both had a fantastic time together away from busy everyday life. We thoroughly enjoyed, the simple life of the TGO Challenge.

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Walking down to Montrose

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We will always have great memories from our challenge

Thank you:

A huge thank you to Jen and Ade who came to our rescue in Braemar, and your chat was amazing as always; to Steph and her son Callum for keeping us going towards the end; and finally to my Dad and Cath who drove us to our start point and were there to welcome us into Montrose. The support from both of our families and friends throughout the challenge was fantastic. We are also very proud to have raised £818.11 to split between Bliss and Scottish Mountain Rescue, two charities we are proud to support (you can still donate by clicking the links in the text or here: Jessica & Chris’ Justgiving pages).

Day 13 – Tarfside to North Water Bridge (27km 10 hours)

Day 14 – North water Bridge to Kinnaber links and Montrose (12ish km 5.5 hours)

Cambusbarron climbing

On Saturday, we managed to get out into the sun and squeeze in our first outdoor climbing of the year!

Cambusbarron West Quarry (Fourth Quarry) is our nearest climbing crag and on such a beautiful day it was a lovely place to be.

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Sven leading  Still Better than Peak (VS 4c), the obligatory first climb of all our visits, and Chris ready to climb.

This crag catches the sun, dries relatively quickly and has some nice views from the top. The rock is dolerite and can be loose at the top, particularly after the winter, so helmets are definitely highly recommended! Many of the climbs are steep and it can be intimidating for less confident climbers. There are good anchors at the top and we’ve taken lots of friends and family to try out an exhilarating abseil. In the summer, you just have to watch-out for midges among the trees: we’ve had to pack up and run away very quickly, when the breeze has dropped.

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Chris happy to be out climbing again, belaying at the top of Cha (S 4a), Jessica and Chris on Not Easy Contract (E1 5b)

You will often find a few members of the University of Stirling Mountaineering Club there, but despite the gorgeous conditions, we had it to ourselves. Access is very easy, just a five minute flat walk from Old Drove Road in Cambusbarron (Stirling), the start of which gives fantastic views across to the mountains, making it a nice venue for a quick after-work climb.

Nevis Gorge and Steall Falls

Following our day out with British Mountain Guide Andy Cave, we decided to take a wander up to the Steall Falls in Glen Nevis. It was raining and we had wanted to make the most of the hotel facilities in the morning, so this short walk was ideal. From Fort William, you take the road all the way to the end of Glen Nevis where there is a free car park. A good path leads away into the dramatic gorge, however it is rough and at times the ground drops away steeply, so care and good footwear is needed.

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View up the Water of Nevis from the path

After winding through the forest, with the river rushing over rocks below, you come out into an open valley. The huge Steall Falls are immediately visible pouring down the hillside ahead. The path leads off east down the valley, but you can turn right towards the river to get a bit closer. A wire bridge crosses the river, which is not for the faint-hearted. A hut is situated on the other side and a boggy walk to the base of the falls is possible, but according to Chris wasn’t worth the muddiness, as the views are actually better from the river.

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Steall Falls in the cloud

Harry Potter fans might recognise the landscape from the film Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, when Harry battles the dragon.

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This bridge requires a lot of concentration (it is also right at the end of the walk and it’s therefore not essential to cross it!)

This is a brilliant walk for groups of friends or families wanting quick access to some wilderness and spectacular scenery, the rocky path might add an extra little sense of adventure.

Distance: 3.5 km / 2.25 miles

Ascent: 220 m

Time: 1.5 hours

Blowy in the Black Mount: Stob a Choire Odhair & Stob Ghabhar

Recently I had the opportunity to climb two new munros with a friend from work. Stob a Choire Odhair and Stob Ghabhar were the munros of choice and as the forecast was looking good, apart from the wind (but more on that later),  we decided to get a nice early start on Saturday morning.

A short approach from the carpark at Victoria Bridge, near Bridge of Orchy, leads you to the base of the first munro, Stob a Choire Odhair.  A path north, just after a green hut on the main landrover track is the direct way onto the mountain. This good path becomes a relentless plod, especially as the last kilometre and a half is very steep. You are rewarded however, with some terrific views over Rannoch Moor to the north east and Glen Etive to the west. As the wind started to pick up, we huddled down behind the rocks on the summit for some food and a cup of hot squash.

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View of Rannoch Moor

As we descended the west ridge towards Coirein Lochain the wind eased; this was mainly due to a mountain being in the way, and we had an opportunity to really take in our surroundings. We were walking through a corridor, with white hills in all directions, as well as spectacular views of inhospitable land making us feel very small indeed.

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Looking back to Stob a Choire Odhair

As we ascended the north bulge of the Aonach Eagach (not the famous Glencoe ridge) it was hard work due to the very soft snow lying on top of wet turf and scree: uphill swimming I think they call it.

As we hit the top of the Aonach Eagach, that wind, wow! It was ferocious as it pounded us from all angles meaning we took our time crossing the west ridge connecting us to munro number two, Stob Ghabhar. The strong winds meant only a few minutes were bearable on the summit, plus the time for a summit selfie, obviously.

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Elliot on the ridge

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Windy Summit

As we descended the broad west ridge of Stob Ghabhar, the wind continued to accelerate, driving our feet through the snow as we leaned into each strengthening gust. Blocks of snow were lifted high into the air just as the spindrift would spiral around us, temporarily causing a white out.

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View down the west shoulder of Stob Ghabhar

As we dropped down the SW side of the mountain, we were happy to be sheltered from the wind. From there, a bit of bum sliding took us down the slope which would lead us south to the main track, along the river and back to the car, finishing off a very memorable day.

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Looking back at our day

This was a physically demanding day due to the strong winds and snow conditions, but it was also a great one. A big thanks to Elliot for his company and suggesting the route, I hope we can get out again in the future.

Details

Distance: 17km

Time: 8 hours

Accent: 1189

Munro summits: Stob Ghabhar (1090m), Stob a Choire Odhair (945m)

Comments

This is a really nice day out: two munros with a funky ridge to navigate as well. Be prepared to feel every meter of accent though.

Also, in winter conditions you must be well prepared in terms of planning and equipment. My ski goggles were my favourite piece of kit: with the strong winds and spindrift they really were essential. Make sure you have a pair.

Ben Ledi

Ben Ledi is perfect when you want a shorter day out: it is a very popular corbett just outside Callander. Having been up twice in bad weather, I had never really considered what you might see from the top, so the wonderful views we had 10 days ago were something of a surprise. The “sledging” was just an added perk! We didn’t even have to get up too early….perfect!

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First snack stop: we were sheltered from the wind for the first section of the walk.

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Beautiful conditions

Details

Distance: 10km

Ascent: 760m

Time: ~4.5hrs (dawdling, chatting and digging holes in the snow)

Summit: Ben Ledi (879m)

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The Trossachs looking wonderful.

Comments

A brilliant, popular and very easily accessible shorter walk (see Walkhighlands for route details). However, it still needs to be taken seriously, particularly when the forecast isn’t great: we have experienced some pretty uncomfortable conditions up there in the past. Although short, some sections of the ascent are quite steep and it’s quite exposed near the top. Car parking can also be limiting if the conditions are good.

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Happy walkers!